Goza & Honnold Handling IVC Filter Cases

Do you have complications related to an inferior vena cava implant?

Goza & Honnold is actively handling cases involving inferior vena cava (IVC) filters.

An IVC filter is a small, umbrella-like device inserted into one of the largest veins in the human body, called the inferior vena cava. It is used in patients who are at high risk of pulmonary embolism, often patients who cannot take anticoagulation medication. The filter’s desired purpose is catching blood clots in the bloodstream before they can travel to the heart, lungs, or brain.

Manufacturers intended the filters to be temporary, but many become embedded and otherwise incapable of being removed without severe injury. In addition, the filters are known to break apart, migrate, or puncture the vein wall and other nearby organs, resulting in significant retrieval complications and injury.

The FDA issued a safety notice on August 9, 2010 in response to the large number of patient injuries reported in association with inferior vena cava filters. The FDA warned physicians that they should consider removing IVC filters as soon as protection from pulmonary embolism was no longer needed.

On May 6, 2014, the FDA issued another safety communication warning physicians they [should] “consider removing the filter as soon as protection from pulmonary embolism has passed.”  The FDA supported its warning by stating that there was a lack of reliable data regarding the safety and efficacy of IVC filters, and that an analysis of what medical literature was available suggested the risks of an IVC Filter exceeded any benefit within 60 days after implantation, if the risk for pulmonary embolism had passed. The FDA concluded that “a patient should be referred for IVC filter removal when the risk/benefit profile favors removal and the procedure is feasible given the patient’s health status.”

Goza & Honnold has filed a number of IVC cases and is investigating many others. Contact us today at (913) 451-3433 for your free consultation.